The purists may grumble it lacks the blackened romanticism of The Cure at their most cutting edge, but it’s nice to hear old Bob sounding so utterly besotted – even if his paramour does, admittedly, go AWOL by the time he’s done. And so it was with ‘Pacific State’, a mixture of sexy saxaphone skronking and brain-burrowing bass so relentless it could worm its way into your noggin and stay there forever more. Javascript is required to view shouts on this page. Creepy, but bloody brilliant all the same. Ditching their chugging guitar sound of yore for funkier pastures was a brave move, but the lyrics were still unmistakably Collins: a finely-observed tale of tongue-tied ineptitude and lovelorn regret that made for a perfect slice of sophisticated pop. With ‘Three Feet High And Rising’, De La Soul’s pivotal rap album, the trio ushered in the Daisy Age- a touchy-feely era which contrasted with the harder, more gansta rap elements in the scene. Hier gibt es nur die größten Hits der 80er Jahre! It introduced us to a chap with NHS specs, a superfluous hearing aid and a way with words not heard in British pop since – ooh – Ray Davies? – but it’s hard to glean such subtleties when you’re being battered with a heavy metal sledgehammer. Words: Ben Hewitt, Matthew Horton, Priya Elan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WR8cvRgW3wk. Alle großen NDW-Hits hier im 80er Radio Die 80er Jahre schlugen in Deutschland musikalisch ein wie eine Bombe - das beweist auch unsere "Best of 80s-Playlist" hier im Internetradio. He’s talking gibberish, surely: the slow-burn beginning is fantastic, true, but the whole ruddy song – with its balmy organ waltz and irrepressible feel-good factor – is the sound of Talking Heads at their most wonderfully accessible. [sidebar id=”premium_inline_before_last_p”]. Start the wiki. Appropriately enough, the song was anchored by some bright ska rhythms, Suggs’ nervy vocal style and a general sense of mischievousness which pervaded everything. Still, we all know it’s just a chance to air those patented hiccups, brutally stark beats and an immortal bassline from Louis Johnson. Refine See titles to watch instantly, titles you haven't rated, etc. JAMC’s second album ‘Darklands’ proved they’d tidied up since the thrilling mess of ‘Psychocandy’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWtCittJyr0. It’s all about Richie Sambora’s talk box really, isn’t it? Extraordinarily, ‘Push It’ started out as a B-side to ‘Tramp’, relegated by a grind around an Otis Redding sample. Grace Jones’s fusion of funk and reggae, a perfect blend for the Island label, was smoothed considerably by rhythm section Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare, who slipped comfortably into the musical melting pot of the new wave scene. One of the earliest cuts from the Bjork-fronted Sugacubes – and appropriately weird and disturbing to boot. It builds and builds until you can take no more. © 2020 NME is a member of the media division of BandLab Technologies. Propelled by war-hammer drums and the bomb-like stomp of him thwacking his guitar, it also has some of the Modfather’s finest lyrics to boot as its righteous damnation of the Government’s nukes-over-society policy cemented his place as one of the UK’s greatest social commentators. It shifted a million copies here to become 1982’s biggest selling single, then dosey doed over to America the next year to repeat the feat. 4,4 von 5 Sternen 193. Deleting this artist may remove other artists and scrobbles from your library - please handle with caution! A worthy first UK Number One for Messr Weller, ‘Going Underground’ will forever be one of The Jam’s finest cuts. Robert Smith’s beautiful slice of pounding acoustic-pop was a surging, multi-tracked work of wonder that continued the band’s run of brilliant singles, following ‘The Love Cats’ and preceding ‘Close To Me’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q5WjYjzrEQ. Ex and future Eagle Henley has lost his lover and his direction, but hey – there’s still a lot of cash to be made. Jim’s vocals are still bottoming out, but some classic ‘Be My Baby’ drums and a hook as clear as a bell open a new JAMC chapter. Add to that synthesized horns that actually work and a melody that’s bottled melancholy, and it’s another regal single from Tennant and Lowe. Though, these days, a cape trip is about the height of Madge’s tabloid-baiting power, the queen of the pop controversy used to trade in far more eyebrow-raising fare. Social comment dressed up in pastoral clothes, there’s a lot of Weller’s future here, and an awful lot about ourselves. But it was Rakim’s brilliantly humble rap that elevated this track into the realms of the truly legendary. Let us know what you think of the Last.fm website. Deleting this artist may remove other artists and scrobbles from your library - please handle with caution! James Hetfield claimed this was about how taking shitloads of drugs makes it impossible to function as a normal human being – whodathunkit! Robert Smith aims solely at the heartstrings with a gorgeous, gilt-edged guitar line and some of his most unabashedly starry-eyed and soppy lyrics to date. Mixing spaghetti western guitar parts, a circular bass solo and lyrics that suggested complete nuclear annihilation, it was one of Blondie’s most experimental and jaw dropping singles. Poised between staying or leaving both The Clash and girlfriend Ellen Foley, Mick Jones’s lyrics were appropriately propulsive. ‘Two Tribes’ was the follow-up to the censor-baiting ‘Relax’, but it was a monster hit in its own right – even though it didn’t induce the same foaming-mouth fury as its predecessor, it still topped the UK charts for nine weeks. All that “If the devil is six…” business was supposedly a jumbled reference to Hebrew numerology, a truly apocalyptic slant to the rest of ‘Monkey Gone To Heaven’ which has more immediate environmental concerns. http://players.brightcove.net/19012535001/default_default/index.html?videoId=1414932997001. Sometimes, single releases may be credited to Various Artists wh…, Warning! Heavens, is that Morrissey being romantic? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMThz7eQ6K0. Yeah, that important. It’s still amazing, obviously. http://players.brightcove.net/19012535001/default_default/index.html?videoId=1490891848001. It floats like a butterfly, hovers like a ghost and really narked Guthrie off because it got so much more radio play than any Cocteaus track. By the time ‘We Care A Lot’ smashed onto the radio, it ushered in a new wave of anti- poser, alternative metal that didn’t live or die on the number of virgins that had been sacrificed the evening before. ‘You Made Me Realise’ is a pop song in essence, but around the hooks and riffs it’s a feat in discombobulation that’ll leave you dizzy whether you’ve packed your earplugs or not. We had New Order and Frankie Goes To Hollywood, U2, Prince and Cyndi Lauper, Springsteen, INXS, Bananarama, Duran Duran and the list goes on. It’s Spinderella’s record, scratching and diving between the proto-rave synths, while Salt-n-Pepa limit themselves to the occasional quickfire verse. The Clash didn’t always need anger to pen a canny political song. Quite a sweet chorus for a Pixies song, really, but nicely offset by some deranged Black Francis screaming about “GOD is seven!“. Seite 1 von 1 Zum Anfang Seite 1 von 1 . Penned by Christine McVie about new husband Eddie Quintela, it was McVie doing what she did best; a simple song about the joys of new love. This is Phil talking, and he believes what the old man said. Dressed in scratchy pre-grunge threads, ‘Freak Scene’ really lies somewhere along the wavy line between The Only Ones’ ‘Another Girl Another Planet’ and Pavement’s ‘Summer Babe’, slack as it wants to be but still cute as hell. Who left the kettle on? Hier gibt es nur die größten Hits der 80s! It opened new vistas for the band, making them the stars they always knew they were. 8,29 € Weiter. Audio CD. Listen free to Various Artists – 100 Hits of the '80s (Wake Me up Before You Go-Go, Girls … It’s all drenched in strings, nostalgia and pathos as Moz starts filling up about greased tea and grey proms, spooning on the melodrama until we’re all remembering miserable holidays in the English rain. It would prove a natural fit for The xx ,who memorably covered the song years later. But look at that Jesus Christ pose on the sleeve, listen to the talk of “sacrifice” – there was more going on here, and a killer middle eight to boot. It’s not just furious thrashing, though – the lengthy instrumental breakdown, which kicks in halfway through, is evidence of four dudes at the top of their game. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9dOrmf5_i0. Instead, it’s a celebration of debauchery, a whirlwind of sludgy guitars and tongue-in-cheek jokes about lackluster blowjobs. The drama of Almond’s delivery went perfectly with the chilly brooding synth lines Ball had crafted. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E1-VOMxS6w. It’s a Byrdsian jangle with that essential Madchester swagger and bite from Ian Brown’s lyric, later better known for devolving into cries of “Amateurs!” as The Late Show‘s power blew. Like nothing else in the Smiths cannon, it paired Morrissey’s most painfully personal lyric (“I am human and I need to be loved just like everybody else does”) with Marr’s most musically inventive soundscape (he later cited obscure disco songs as influences). There were still good records to be made but this straddles the eras, anthemic but nasty with enough of a whiff of the underground to keep the early adopters on board. Simon was in rare form on the title track on his pivotal 86 album. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ChjLMbXVrU. With Bobby Gillespie gone, they’d switched to crisp drum machine beats and ‘April Skies’ was almost conventional in structure. Whatever happened to the hippie dream? “Here I go!” she shouts, unable to control herself, and you’re whipped up with lust alongside her. On his second solo single after becoming an ex-Smith, Morrissey’s still happily at home with the dour, world-weary stuff but this time he’s calling for seaside Armageddon to a gorgeous, classic melody. Now that’s what we call a comeback. Named after the American plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, ‘Enola Gay’ married Andy McClusky’s brilliantly quizzical vocal and placed OMD’s unstoppable mesh of synths and programmed beats front and centre to create a pop classic. Released as the lead single from his seminal Purple Rain album and film, the bass-free ‘When Doves Cry’ was a thing of graceful beauty. The peak of AC/DC’s lithe, fat-free years. Es ist schwer bis unmöglich, eine “objektive” Liste der besten 80er Songs zu erstellen – … Here, they struck gold with this searching, rap-pop gem which sampled ‘Multiplication Rock’. Cameo had been around for donkey’s years, even occasionally sidling into the UK charts with the ultra-smooth funk of ‘She’s Strange’ and ‘Single Life’, but it took an enormous red codpiece and silly twang to make Larry Blackmon a true star. As it was, it didn’t matter that he was hitching a ride because the song was perfect – odd, self-referential and as pure pop as he’d never be again. Go directly to shout page. Written by Tim Booth during a period of feeling isolated, the anthemic qualities of the track were picked up by students everywhere, as James became part of the Madchester scene and the legend of ‘Sit Down’ grew and grew. The Smiths’ second single succeeded where ‘Hand In Glove’ had failed, piercing the Top 30 and getting a bunch of gladioli on Top Of The Pops. A smash No.90 hit, ‘Made Of Stone’ nevertheless brought the Roses to wider attention, making some waves on the indie chart and encouraging the kids to check out the album that would become their all-time favourite. But combining it with a gigantic gospel-tinged chorus the world could sing along to? The genius of Graham Massey and his Manchester raveheads was to take the standard building blocks of techno and house, before twisting and molding them into something else entirely. “The song with no chorus” – that was how the Pet Shop Boys referred to this one on the quiet, but it had a bevy of other assets to offset that. And that message is “Don’t look back/ You can never look back“. Written by Frank Black after he went scuba diving, the track landed in the middle of ‘Surfer Rosa’ in all its wild, wind swept glory, anchored by Kim Deal’s ‘Ooh-Woo’’s and a simple guitar riff. ‘Buffalo Stance’ came along at a time when dance, hip-hop and pop were creating thrilling hybrids (see also ‘Salt N Pepa’s ‘Push It’ and Tone Loc’s ‘Funky Cold Medina’). Quincy Jones didn’t want the song on the album, which shows what he knows. One of the finest examples of Mark E Smith’s musical mantra of “Repetition, repetition, repetition”, as The Fall’s curmudgeonly ringmaster incessantly shrieks the chorus over the off-kilter hook of a honking horn. Whatever the truth was, it gave them their first US Number One and successfully managed to reinvent Van Halen as a synth-using pop rock band who weren’t afraid of massive, massive hooks. Like the yang to ‘Blue Monday’’s ying, this track was a tripped out love song to a strange relationship. Everyone saw sense soon enough and this pumping, hollering groove topped charts all over the globe. Originally called ‘The Chemist Façade’, Madness’ most ridiculously happy tune was actually about the horror of going to the pharmacy to buy condoms for the first time. This surreal mix – Colourbox and AR Kane, Dave Dorrell and CJ Mackintosh – produced a record that was clever enough to woo the purists, pop enough to top the singles charts and cheeky enough to get torpedoed by a writ from Stock Aitken Waterman. How many bands could get away with lyrics as daft as “Promise me I’m safe as houses/ As long as I remember who’s wearing the trousers”? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YrXY4isgLs. Always a brilliant lyric writer, Joe Strummer’s narrative thrust on ‘Straight To Hell’ was multi-dimensional. Only Neil Tennant could wedge his tongue so far in his cheek to set a rousing defiance of his Catholic upbringing to hi-NRG opera. Over 30 years later, it’s still unbeatable. Public Enemy’s first UK top 20 hit (they never had one of them at home) is as naggingly catchy as any hip-hop smash had to be back in 1988, a relentless squirt of whistles and looped beats absolutely peppered with quotable rhymes and Flavor Flav madness. Its air of mystery slotted handily into the film, but Ian McCulloch knew he had a belter on his hands from the moment he woke up one morning with the chorus already in his head. Now that they’re the punchline to a million stadium-rock sized jokes, it’s easy to forget what made everyone first fall in love with U2 many moons ago – namely, big ol’ emotional rock ballads like this. As the theme song to pivotal 80s teen drama The Breakfast Club, it found its deeper meaning within the story lines of the disenfranchised youngsters in the flick. ‘She Bangs The Drums’ saw the Roses tipping their caps to the ephemeral moments one has with a new sweetheart, with John Squire later comparing it to “staying up til dawn and watching the sun come up with someone you love.” The penetrating bass, and the ‘endless summer’ vibe of the music, expressed these emotions with perfect eloquence. It became their trademark song, and for good reason. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1wg1DNHbNU. Most often on Last.fm, compilation album tracks appear under the name of Various Artists erroneously because the individual artist is not listed in the album's ID3 information. For better or worse, ‘The One I Love’ was REM’s big push through the commercial barriers, a US top 10 hit transforming them in one fell swoop from floppy-haired college radio darlings to bald-bonced plane-trashing heroes of the glossy monthlies. Hard to listen to now without getting something in your eye about Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson in Lost In Translation, ‘Just Like Honey’ revealed there was more to the Reid brothers than devastating shards of noise battling against tinny drums and subterranean vocals. From the squall of 1977’s ‘White Riot’ to this 1982 parting shot. Touching upon the breakdown of the relationship with her boyfriend/manager, ‘Time After Time’ was a change in tack for Lauper, whose musical persona had previously been unstoppably light and frothy. Perhaps its key trick was the slowing down/speeding up of the track mid song.